SNGF: My Father’s Maternal Line

It’s time for Saturday Night Genealogy Fun.  Thanks to Randy for this challenge!  This one is all about my Dad’s mother’s line.

My Dad’s mother’s name was Anna Madeleine Mazeres.  She was born 17 Oct 1897 in San Francisco, CA and died 2 Feb 1984, also in San Francisco (though she lived in Oakland, CA most of her adult life).  She outlived my grandfather by 10 years.

My Grandmother’s patrilineal line is as follows:

  • Charles Mazeres dit Salanave (1868-1926),
  • Jean Mazeres dit Salanave (1824-1893),
  • Jean Pierre Mazeres (1794-1836)
  • Jean Mazeres (1742-1825),
  • Clement Mazeres (1722-1781),
  • Jean Mazeres (1697-????),
  • Jean Mazeres (1666-????)
  • Bertrand Cambus (1640-????)

This is the end of her patrilineal line.  The Mazeres surname is carried back through the maternal line from this point.

My Grandmother had one brother, Jean Emile Mazeres, born 29 Jun 1899 in San Francisco.  Sadly, he died 24 Jun 1903, in Modesto, CA.  My grandmother had a sister, but she died at the age of 2.  My grandma was the only one of Brigitte Breilh’s children to survive, so there are no male descendants from her family for the Y-DNA test.

I hope to be able to work in the village of Castet soon so that I can carry this line back even further.

jeanlassalleannamazeresca1920111

A photo of my grandparents ca 1920.

 

 

 

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First Swab Done!

I mentioned the other day that I was getting my very own DNA test kit (it was a gift).  Today, my kit came and I couldn’t wait to do my swab.  I’m eager like that.

This is what the kit looked like:

 

_20140619_308dna

It includes two test swabs, two vials for the swab ends to placed in, and a consent form.  All this will be placed into a mailer and sent off to the secret labs at FTDNA (okay, maybe not so secret).

I got everything ready.  I had a timer set up on my tablet so I could count the 60 seconds.  Then, I washed my hands and began swabbing.

I was a little leery about the scraper, but the word “scraper” is a misnomer.  It’s very, very soft.  Not like a soft toothbrush, but like cotton ball soft.  I did a full minute of rubbing with the scraper.  Then, it was time to put the scraper in the vial.

If you have arthritis in your hands you know that dexterity isn’t your number one quality.  I got the lid off the vial and had an “oh crap” moment.  You put the scraper end that you use for the DNA sample into the vial and press the end of the scraper.  It’s supposed to pop off into the vial.  Mine didn’t at first.  It took a couple of tries, but eventually the fingers figured out what they were supposed to do.

Since it’s already 9pm and I haven’t had dinner, I’ll wait until tomorrow to do the second sample.  Then, it’s off to the post office it goes.

 

 

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Guess who is getting her DNA tested?

Well, after getting an offer I couldn’t refuse (my DNA kit is a gift), I’m finally going to do the DNA test. I’m getting the autosomal test (Family Finder) from FtDNA. I’ve already joined the Azores Project and uploaded my GEDCOM. I’m ready to go when my kit gets here!

I’m not sure what I will learn from this test. I have my Azorean and French roots back to the 1600s and earlier in some cases. It will be my maternal grandmother’s line that might turn up something interesting in my chromosomes. I haven’t worked any of her lines back to the country of origin yet. They include Ireland, Australia, Wales, and England. And, her father’s line is still stuck right where I had him when I began researching almost 25 years ago.

I would like to make connections with people, of course. I think my best bet will be on the Azorean lines. I already have made connections in my villages through research. Given the somewhat isolated nature of their existence, I would suspect they were marrying each other left and right.

Anyway, it looks like I am embarking on a new adventure with my genealogy. I don’t think anything beats doing the research, but this will be interesting to pour over and analyze.

Stay tuned… :)

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