52 Ancestors Week 15: The Curious Spelling of Jozimas

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Onward to week 15 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.  This week is all about spelling.  The question was posed as thus: How Do You Spell That? What ancestor do you imagine was frequently asked that? Which ancestor did you have a hard time finding because of an unusual name? Picture if you … Continued

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Theodore Pacheco: A Soldier’s Story

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Theodore Pacheco was born 31 Aug 1899, Kilauea, Kauai. He was the third child of Joao Pacheco and Joana Goncalves Cardoza–a family nicknamed “The Reds” because of their red hair. He grew up in Kilauea, but left home sometime after his father’s death and his mother’s second marriage (1906-1910). When he was about 16, he … Continued

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Carolina (Freitas) Pacheco’s Individual Summary

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Carolina’s family was from Kilauea just like my Pacheco’s.  She married my grandfather’s cousin, Manoel Pacheco, in Kilauea in 1914.  A couple of years later they moved their family to King City.  I don’t know much about Carolina except that she was said to make the best pancakes.  I guess something like that sticks with … Continued

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Joaquina Rosa (Raposo) Camara

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Joaquina was my Great Great Uncle, Joao “John Cosma” Jacinto da Camara’s mother.  Joaquina was pregnant when they made the journey to Hawaii in 1882.  She gave birth to twins on board the ship.  Sadly, they died before the family made it to port in Honolulu. Name:    Joaquina Roza RAPOSO-430 Sex:    Female Father:    Francisco RAPOSO … Continued

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A Mini Brick Wall: Ana Jacinta

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[Fearless Females-Women’s History Month, March 20th:  Female ancestor who is a brick wall] My female ancestors have been good to me.  They have left pretty good trails despite being woman.  There is one female ancestor I consider a mini brick wall.  Despite the fact that I can go back beyond Ana Jacintha de Melo Pacheco, … Continued

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Guilhermina (Clemente) Ventura’s Individual Summary

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Guilhermina was the mother-in-law of Jose Pacheco (aka Joe Pacheco Smith).  Her daughter, Minnie, married Jose.  Her son, Manoel, married Jose’s cousin, Isabella Pacheco de Braga. Guilhermina was born in Magdalena do Mar in 1877.  She migrated to Kauai, HI as a child.  She married Francisco de Boa Ventura on Kauai and they had several … Continued

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Maria Candida de Jesus Ferreira Grota’s Individual Summary

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Note that Maria is recorded in records with surname as “de Jesus”.  This is not a surname, but a religious name.  Portuguese women took on religious names that were similar to a surname.  Sometimes they changed them at different times of their life. Name:    Maria Candida de JESUS-2702 Sex:    Female Individual Facts Birth    1816    Estrela, … Continued

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Margaret (Caetano) Mello’s Individual Summary

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Margaret’s mother was a cousin to my great great grandmother, Maria da Conceicao (de Mello) de Braga.  Her parents also came to Hawaii as contract laborers to work on the sugar plantations.  (Note:  This photo is the only one I have of Margaret.  It comes from her application for  a delayed birth certificate.) Name:    Margaret … Continued

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An Azorean Marriage Record: Maria and Jozimas

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[Fearless Females, Prompts for Women’s History Month, March 4th: Marriage Record of my Great Great Grandparents] In my previous entry, I showed you a copy of the Marriage record for my Great Grandparents, Theodoro Pacheco and Maria de Braga.  The record was from a Catholic Church and was written in Latin. This next example is … Continued

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I finally found Ana Jacinta’s baptismal record

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Before arthritis (also known as the time period B.A.), I used to go to the Family History Center in Oakland once or twice a month.  I spent many hours pouring over the microfilm for Achada, Nordeste, Sao Miguel Island, Azores. I had a mystery to solve and the answer was in those microfilms.  I had … Continued

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What did that V stand for?

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When searching through social security death records I noticed something peculiar.  Many of my Portuguese Hawaiian male relatives born between 1880 and 1910 had middle initials.  I found this peculiar because the Portuguese didn’t use middle names. What was even stranger was when I asked their close relatives about the middle initial.  It seemed they … Continued

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Surname Saturday: de Braga of Maia, Ribeira Grande

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Last week I finished my the Pacheco side of my family tree.  This week I will start with the de Braga side. The de Braga’s were from Maia, Ribeira Grande, Sao Miguel Island, Azores.  This is my Great Grandmother, Maria d’Espirito Santo (de Braga) Pacheco Smith’s side of the family.  She was the wife of … Continued

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Friday Free Ebook: History of the Azores 1813

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I came across this book today and thought that others might enjoy it.  It is “History of the Azores: or Western Islands; containing an account of the government, laws, and religion, the manners, ceremonies, and character of the inhabitants; and demonstrating the importance of these islands to the British Empire”.  Phew!  I think the title … Continued

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Friday Free Ebook: Portuguese English Dictionary 1860

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This week I’ve selection a Portuguese English dictionary as our Friday Free Ebook.  In talking with different Portuguese genealogists, we sometimes lament that it would be nice to have a language dictionary from the era we are translating from.  While modern dictionaries are helpful, they sometimes miss minor spelling differences and variations in definition.  Being … Continued

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