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Category: Portuguese Hawaiian Roots

The Problem with Names Part 2: Latinization

The Problem with Names Part 2: Latinization

For many early Portuguese immigrants to Hawaii, their main contact outside of the plantation was through the local Catholic Church. For many genealogists, church records may be the only way to identify links back to the “old country”. When researching, you must be aware of the many name variations or you may miss your ancestors. One problem exists with Catholic Church records–they’re written in Latin. Like most, my knowledge of Latin is limited to the study of word origins in…

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The Problem with Names Part 1: How’s that Spelled?

The Problem with Names Part 1: How’s that Spelled?

Many of the first wave of Portuguese immigrants carried very little if any documentation with them. They were most likely poor and illiterate. The people in Hawaiian taking information from these immigrants usually had no prior knowledge of the language. Portuguese enunciation was different from what they were used to. Also, the recorder wasn’t always sure what to do with the de, da, and d’. They often blended these with the rest of the name. Because of this, the recorder…

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Early Hawaiian Death Records

Early Hawaiian Death Records

Before 1900, what we consider death certificates did not exist in Hawaii. There are no death certificates on file for the early era. The official documents consist of the death register books and indexes. Most of these have been microfilmed by one group or another. Information Collected Let’s look at a typical register page. This example comes from the island of Kauai, but is probably the same style used on the other islands. Each book is divided by district and…

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52 Ancestors Week 15: The Curious Spelling of Jozimas

52 Ancestors Week 15: The Curious Spelling of Jozimas

Onward to week 15 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.  This week is all about spelling.  The question was posed as thus: How Do You Spell That? What ancestor do you imagine was frequently asked that? Which ancestor did you have a hard time finding because of an unusual name? Picture if you will illiterate immigrants who come from a country (Azores) during an era where the world has not caught on to the standardization of spelling.  That…

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Theodore Pacheco: A Soldier’s Story

Theodore Pacheco: A Soldier’s Story

Theodore Pacheco was born 31 Aug 1899, Kilauea, Kauai. He was the third child of Joao Pacheco and Joana Goncalves Cardoza–a family nicknamed “The Reds” because of their red hair. He grew up in Kilauea, but left home sometime after his father’s death and his mother’s second marriage (1906-1910). When he was about 16, he lived with his aunt and uncle, Antonio and Alexandrinha (Jose) in California. In 1918, too young to be drafted, he enlisted in the US Army….

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