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Tag: Immigration Research

I Didn’t Plan to Research the Whole Village of Maia

I Didn’t Plan to Research the Whole Village of Maia

I didn’t plan on researching the whole village. No, really. I didn’t. I started out following the trail of my great grandmother, Maria (de Braga) Pacheco Smith, in Maia  like a good genealogist.  Maia is a village on Sao Miguel Island in the Azores.   I found more ancestors and added more lines.  I found the siblings and added them.  I found their children and noted them, too. Then, I met a woman who might be related to Maria. We…

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How Many Immigrant Ancestors Are In Your Family Tree?

How Many Immigrant Ancestors Are In Your Family Tree?

I sometimes wonder if my ancestor’s experience was the same as other people’s.  I’ve written before about how my family tree is made up of new immigrants.  There are no pilgrims, Puritans, or Revolutionary War heroes in my tree–so far. My first immigrant ancestor didn’t arrive on the scene until the 1840s. What about your family tree? Were you’re ancestors members of Native American tribes or Native Hawaiians? Were they one of the first Europeans to arrive on America’s shores?…

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Were my relatives deported?

Were my relatives deported?

I’ve looked up many cousins in the Ellis Island immigrant database.  I’ve viewed many ship manifests.  Every now and then I see something I’ve never seen before.  Such was the case with the ship manifest for the Carreiro family. Luiz Carreiro, his wife Francisca Julia da Conceicao Pacheco (aka Remigio Pacheco), their five children Maria, Jose, Manoel, Luiz, and  Jacintho, and Luiz’s mother, Maria do Espirito Santo Carreiro, were on the ship the Reginia d’Italia which arrived at Ellis Island…

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The Curious Passport Record

The Curious Passport Record

Research Journal #2, Entry #2 When I started this research project, I knew a little about the Cosma family. They were headed by Jacinto Cosma and Joaquina Rosa. Their children were Manoel, Maria, John, Shandra, Francisco, and Maria. They arrived in Hawaii in 1882 and their twins died on the voyage. It was time to start comparing the family lore to documentation. Jacinto’s tombstone at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Oakland, California confirmed the family name. It read: Jacint Cosma and…

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